The public’s business: on the NH legislative agenda for Feb. 18-20

Housing Appeals Board repeal, commercial property tax proposal up for committee hearings

On Tuesday, Feb. 18, there will be hearings on a proposal to repeal the Housing Appeals Board. Also, expect committee votes on a bill that would require landlords to give 90-day notice on rent increases of 5% or more, and a bill to tax commercial and residential property at different rates. The New Hampshire House is scheduled to meet on Wednesday, Feb. 19, and Thursday, Feb. 20, to vote on measures that would expand net metering, legalize marijuana, regulate drones, use tax incentives for affordable housing and tax electronic devices, among others.

Tuesday, Feb. 18

At 9:30 a.m., the Senate Education and Workforce Development Committee will hold a hearing on Senate Bill 726, which would – among other things — require the business finance authority to make loans available to small business concerns owned and controlled by veterans and the adjutant general to expand job training and apprenticeship programs for veterans.

At 9:45 a.m., the Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on SB 487, which would repealing the housing appeals board establishing affordable housing commission

At 10 a.m., the House Resources and Recreation and Development Committee is scheduled to vote on House Bill 1414, which would require a person who files a notice of intent to cut timber with assessing officials to also notify property abutters of the intent to cut.

The House Environment and Agriculture Committee will hold hearings:

At 11 a.m. on HB 1418, which would allow department of agriculture funds to be used to increase farm energy efficiency.

At 2 p.m. on HB 1658, which would establish a registration program for growers and producers of hemp and hemp products.

At 3:30 p.m. on HB 1704, which would require the Department of Environmental Services make rules about composting meat and animal products.

At 11 a.m. The House Science, Technology and Energy Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1225, which would expand the maximum net metering limits from one to five megawatts for municipal hydroelectric facilities.
  • HB 1262, which would make it easier for small producers of electricity to sell to consumers directly, not just to utilities.

At 1 p.m. The Senate Transportation Committee will hold a hearing on SB 610, which would allow the state Department of transportation engage in the regional transportation climate initiative

At 1 p.m. the House Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1109, which would require auto manufacturers to it maintains proprietary repair information for the vehicle for the dealer and purchaser.
  • HB 1215, which would bill prohibit the enforcement of condominium and homeowners association provisions which require greater than a simple majority vote to consent to the installation and use of a solar photovoltaic energy system.
  • HB 1320, which would require a landlord notify a tenant that he/she doesn’t offer rental insurance and recommends that the tenant get it.
  • HB 1151, which would require insurers to use home replacement basis of the municipality’s assessed value of the building and cost of debris removal
  • HB 1464, which would require insurance coverage for yoga therapy as an alternative to opioids.
  • HB 1476, which would prohibit motor vehicle dealers from requiring the purchase of automobile insurance from the dealer as part of the sales contract

At 1 p.m. the House Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1150, which would permit qualified patients visiting from out-of-state to access New Hampshire therapeutic cannabis dispensaries.
  • HB 1424, which would authorize alternative treatment centers to sell hemp CBD oil products and use hemp oil in cannabis-infused products.

At 1 p.m. the Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1120, which would require periodic water tests of rental property.
  • HB 1207, which would require landlords to notify prospective tenants of the use of pesticides or other toxins in the premises
  • HB 1247, which would require landlords give 90 days of notice before raising the rent by more than 5 percent.
  • HB 1511, which would allow a landlord to evict a tenant in 45 days, compared to the current three months.
  • HB 1539, which would appear to toughen the requirements for landlords to relocate children with elevated lead levels during abatement.

At 1:30 p.m. the Municipal and County Government Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1104, which would give the selectmen the right to demolish buildings
  • HB 1467, would enable municipalities to tax of commercial, industrial and residential property at different rates.

At 4:30 p.m. the House Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1578, which would require Internet access providers to reimburse customers for interruptions in service and makes the failure to do so a violation of the Consumer Protection Act.
  • HB 1589, which would require businesses accept cash for payment.

Wednesday, Feb. 19

At 10 a.m. The Senate Executive Departments and Administration Committee will hold a hearing on SB 593, which would prohibit the use of titles and descriptions of services of a physician licensed by the board of medicine by unlicensed persons.

The full House will meet starting at 10 a.m. Here is what members are expected to vote on:

  • HB 1662, which would increase the age for sales and possession of tobacco products and e-cigarette from 19 to 21, which would conform to a new federal law.. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee recommended passing it, 12-8.
  • HB 1710, which would disclose the results of child day care monitoring visits, giving providers a chance to respond before it becomes public. The Children and Family Law recommended passing it, 17-0.
  • HB 1712, which would allow child care centers to continue to operate pending appeal of violation unless children’s health and safety were at stake. The Children and Family Law recommended passing it, 16-0.
  • HB 1663, which would legalize, regulate and tax cannabis, The Criminal Justice and Public Safety recommended studying it, 11-7.
  • HB 1692, which would license wild mushroom harvesters and fine those who distributes such mushrooms without a license. The Environment and Agriculture Committee recommended passing it, 19-1.
  • HB 1580, which would regulate drones. The Executive Departments and Administration Committee recommended killing it, 14-6.
  • HB 1260, reduce or eliminate penalties regulating a variety of occupations including cosmetologists, estheticians, barbers, landscape architects, and septic system designers, installers and evaluators. The Executive Departments and Administration Committee recommended killing it, 18-1.
  • HB 1600, which would allow pharmacists to dispense to dispense smoking cessation therapy products and get reimbursed under Medicaid. The Executive Departments and Administration Committee recommended passing it, 16-5.
  • HB 1638, which would allow food stamp recipients to buy fresh produce direct or through cooperatives and grocery stories from local farmers.. The Executive Departments and Administration Committee recommended passing it, 20-0.
  • HB 1106, which would make non-compete provisions in employment contract many mental health professionals are not enforceable. The Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitation Services Committee recommended passing it, 17-0.
  • HB 1543, which would prohibit an employer from using a failed drug test for cannabis use as grounds for terminating the employment of, or to deny promotion to, any employee. The Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitation Services Committee recommended killing it, 19-0.
  • HB 1248, which would allow community revitalization tax incentives to be used for affordable housing outside the center of town. The Municipal and County Government Committee recommended passing it, 12-4.
  • HB 1632, which would establish a business profits tax deduction for income derived from qualifying housing development, reduce the real estate transfer tax for qualifying first time home buyers, allow municipal economic development and revitalization districts and the business finance Authority issue bonds to be used for affordable housing The Municipal and County Government Committee recommended passing it, 16-2.
  • HB 1406, which would – as amended – expands kind of solar energy systems be eligible for a solar energy property tax exemption. The Municipal and County Government Committee recommended passing it, 19-1.
  • HB 1510, which would give a tax exemption to those renting out an accessary dwelling unit to a non-relative. The Municipal and County Government Committee recommended killing it, 19-1.
  • HB 1631, which would require funds collected from hydro-electric generation facilities pursuant to the utility tax be distributed to the municipalities where the facility is located. The Municipal and County Government Committee recommended killing it, 17-1.
  • HB 1650, which would increase the registration fees for all vehicles based on weight and adjust that fee by the miles traveled. The Public Works and Highway Committee recommended killing it, 15-4.
  • HB 1603,, which would establish the per and polyfluoroalkyl substances contamination remediation and mitigation revolving loan program and fund. The Resources, Recreation and Development Committee recommended passing it, 19-0.
  • HB 1364, which would exclude biomass as a special class when it comes the renewable resource portfolio standards. The Science, Technology and Energy Committee recommended killing it, 12-7.
  • HB 1402, which would exempt municipal group net metering projects from the 1 megawatt cap on project size. The Science, Technology and Energy Committee recommended studying it, 12-8.
  • HB 1661, which would prevent property tax exemption water and air pollution control facilities for power plants that uses fossil fuels or generates radioactive waste. The Science, Technology and Energy Committee recommended killing it, 15-5.
  • HB 1664, which would as amended establish a climate action plan – with a goal of up to 80 percent reduction by 2050. The Science, Technology and Energy Committee recommended passing it, 11-8.
  • HB 1684, which would — as amended – make it easier for municipalities and private equity firms to assist in funding local energy conservation projects. The Science, Technology and Energy Committee recommended passing it, 11-8.
  • HB 1363, which would allow motorist service signs (for food, fuel, lodging) on all limited access highways in the state, not just north of Concord. The Transportation Committee recommended passage, 19-0
  • HB 1383, which would prohibit commercial trucks from left lane travel on multi-lane highways. The Transportation Committee recommended killing it, 19-0.
  • HB 1474, which attempts to establish an extra deduction from gross business profits under the business profits tax for income invested in federal Opportunity Zone. The Ways and Means Committee recommended killing it 20-0.
  • HB 1492, which would impose a 4.3 percent sales tax on electric device to fund education. The Ways and Means Committee recommended killing it 20-0.

Thursday, Feb. 20

The full House will meet starting at 1 p.m. Here is what members are expected to vote on:

  • HB 1281, which would require insurance coverage for EpiPens and its generics. .The Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee recommended passing it, 15-5
  • HB 1379, which would require background check for private commercial firearms sales, closing the gun show loophole. The Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee recommended passing it, 11-9.
  • HB 1648, which would legalize the possession, but not the sale, of small amounts of cannabis-infused products. The Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee recommended passing it, 13-7.
  • HB 1224, which would–as amended — appropriate $500,000 to the lakeshore redevelopment planning commission for environmental remediation of the former Laconia state school for economic development. The Finance Committee recommended passage, 21-0
  • HB 1221, which would prohibit an employer from using personal financial and credit history in employment decisions. The Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Committee recommended passing it, 11-6.
  • HB 1210, which would establish a mandatory property tax exemption for energy storage systems on residential property. The Municipal and County Government Committee recommended killing it 5-0.
  • HB 1218, which would expand the maximum net metering limits from one to five megawatts under the existing rates set by the Public Utility Commission, but at the utility default rate to customers who do not want to buy power from a third-party supplier. It requires PUC to monitor and adjust rates to prevent cost shifting. It also restricts the expansions to firms that mainly use the energy they produce. The House Science, Technology and Energy Committee recommended passage, 12-8.
  • HB 1480, which would take away from the Public Utility Committee to increase the Systems Benefits Charge to benefit low income energy efficiency without legislative approval The House Science, Technology and Energy Committee recommended killing it, 11-8.
  • HB 1652, which would tax ski lift sales to fund the governor’s scholarship program. The Ways and Means Committee recommended killing it 20-0.
  • HB 1699, which would increase the tax on e-cigarettes to 40 percent of the price. The Ways and Means Committee recommended passing, 12-8.
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