The public’s business: on the NH legislative agenda for Feb. 12-13

Marijuana legalization, plastics, State of the State on the schedule

Most lawmakers will take Tuesday off for the presidential primary. On Wednesday, they will hear bills legalizing and commercializing marijuana, allowing municipalities to tax commercial property at different rates, requiring large retail stores to collect and recycle plastic bags and letting restaurants allow dogs at sidewalk cafes. There will be committee votes on net metering bills, a climate action plan and prohibiting employers from using credit history in employment decisions. On Thursday, both chambers will hear the governor’s State of the State address. Then the full Senate will vote on a property tax credit for workforce housing and the full House on allowing college athletes to make commercial endorsements.

Wednesday, Feb. 12

At 10 a.m. The House Science, Technology and Energy Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • House Bill 1218, which would expand the maximum net metering limits from one to five megawatts.
  • HB 1225, which would expand the maximum net metering limits from one to five megawatts for municipal hydroelectric facilities.
  • HB 1402, which would exempt municipal group net metering projects from the 1 megawatt cap on project size.
  • HB 1481, which would expand the maximum net metering limits to 125 percent of average monthly demand.
  • HB 1515, which would require the payment adjustment to group host net energy metering systems to apply to systems over 25 kilowatts, as oppose to 15, and it would allow businesses to participate.
  • HB 1262, which would make it easier for small producers of electricity to sell to consumers directly, not just to utilities.
  • HB 1364, which would exclude biomass as a special class when it comes the renewable resource portfolio standards.
  • HB 1661, would prevent property tax exemption water and air pollution control facilities for power plants that uses fossil fuels or generates radioactive waste.
  • HB 1664, which would a climate action plan directing the state Department of Environmental Services set rules on greenhouse gas emission reporting and allowances, so that the will reduce its emissions by half of 1990 levels in 2030 and by 90 percent in 2050.
  • HB 1684, which would use money from the System Benefit Charge to benefit a new state energy conservation program and PACE, a municipal program. Currently that money is being used for the utility’s conservation programs only.

At 10 a.m. the House Executives Departments and Administration Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1580, which would regulate drones
  • HB 1709, which would ease the zoning and fire codes home-based child day care providers, so it will be treated as a home and not a business.
  • HB 1587, which would ease the zoning and fire codes home-based child day care providers, so it will be treated as a home and not a business.

At 10 a.m. the House Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1106, which would make non-compete provisions in employment contract many mental health professionals are not enforceable
  • HB 1144, which would employers with more than 100 employees to submit data on wage differences between male and female employees to the department of labor.
  • HB 1221, which would prohibit an employer from using personal financial and credit history in employment decisions.

At 10:30 a.m. the Municipal and County Government Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1632, which would establish a business profits tax deduction for income derived from qualifying housing development, reduce the real estate transfer tax for qualifying first time home buyers, allow municipal economic development and revitalization districts and the business finance Authority issue bonds to be used for affordable housing
  • HB 1629, which would streamline the municipal approval process for affordable housing
  • HB 1248, which would allow community revitalization tax incentives to be used for affordable outside the center of town.
  • HB 1160, which would enable municipalities to collect a local rooms and meals fund a capital fund, a revolving fund or to support tourism.

The House Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee will hold hearings:

At 9:30 a.m. on HB 1345, which would allow alternative treatment centers to be for profit

At 10 a.m. on HB 1397, which would . creditors to give notice to consumers before referring their debt to collection agencies.

At 10:30 a.m. on HB 1400, which would establish a New Hampshire statutory trust law.

At 1 p.m. on HB 1483, which would allow dogs on open air restaurant patios.

At 1:30 p.m. on HB 1581, would allow sale of hemp products containing CBD, but they must be registered and inspected.

At 2 p.m. on HB 1701, which would require that stores of more than 7000 square feet collect and recycle of single use film plastics, including plastic bags.

At 10 a.m., the Senate Election Law and Municipal Affairs Committee will hold a hearing on Senate Bill 482, which would require that tiny houses be included in municipal building codes.

The House Environment and Agriculture Committee will hold hearings:

At 11 a.m. on HB 1190, which would ban the sale and use of the pesticide chlorpyrifos.

At 2 p.m. on HB 1196, which would ban the use of pesticides that can or might cause cancer or that are labeled toxic to wildlife and set up an alternative pest management working group.

At 3 p.m. on HB 1208, which would require that the Materials Safety Data Sheet for a pesticide application in a residential building be made available to the owner and all occupants.

The House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee will hold hearings:

At 1 p.m. on HB 1663, which would legalize, regulate and tax of cannabis, (to be voted on Thursday at 11 am)

At 1:30 p.m. on HB 1608, which would prohibit the manufacture, sale, transfer, and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices.

At 3 p.m. The House Municipal and County Government Committee will hold a hearing on HB 1467, would enable municipalities to tax of commercial, industrial and residential property at different rates.

Thursday, Feb. 13

The House Resources, Recreation and Development Committee will hold hearings:

At 9 a.m. on HB 1252, which would regulate the sale of travel insurance.

At 9:30 a.m. on HB 1347, which would requires Medicaid cover telemedicine coverage.

At 10:15 a.m. on HB 1124, which would allow domestic insurance companies to use derivatives and other exotic investment tools.

At 11 a.m. The House Health, Human Service and Elderly Affairs Committee is scheduled to vote on:

  • HB 1150, which would permit qualified patients visiting from out-of-state to access New Hampshire therapeutic cannabis dispensaries.
  • HB 1424, which would authorize alternative treatment centers to sell hemp CBD oil products and use hemp oil in cannabis-infused products.

The full Senate will meet starting at 10 a.m. Here is the what senators will be voting on:

  • SB 287, which would set maximum contaminant limits for perfluorochemicals in drinking water. The Energy and Natural Resource Committee recommended passing it, 5-0.
  • SB 496, which would, as amended, set up a loan fund to help communities clean up PFAS contamination. The Energy and Natural Resource Committee recommended passing it, 5-0.
  • SB 668, which would appropriate $102,000 to establish an offshore wind commission, establishing and an office of offshore wind industry development in the department of business and economic affairs, to promote and guide the development of such projects off the state’s seacoast. The Energy and Natural Resource Committee recommended passing it, 4-0.
  • SB 510, which would credit excess funds in the investor education fund to the FRM victim’s fund. The Finance recommended passing it, 4-0.
  • SB 638, which would set up a housing and conservation planning which will provide technical assistance matching grants to municipalities that encourage workforce housing and the reuse of existing buildings. The Finance Committee recommended studying it, 5-0.
  • SB 475, which would enable municipalities to grant a property tax credit for densely-built workforce housing. The Ways and Means Committee recommended passing it, 3-2.
  • SB 527, which would allow and regulate pari-mutuel pools on historic horse racing. The Ways and Means Committee recommended studying it, 3-2.
  • SB 661, which would require that the commissioner of business and economic affairs certify each application for an economic revitalization zone tax credit, modifies the calculation of those credits. The Ways and Means Committee recommended passing it 5-0.
  • SB 662, which would allow for an exemption from income subject to the tax on interest and dividends of a qualifying amount paid for medical care. The Ways and Means Committee recommended passing, 3-2.

The full House will meet starting at 1 p.m. Here is the what members will be voting on:

  • HB 1505, which would allow college athletes to make money for commercial endorsements starting in July 2022.The Education Committee recommended passing it, 20-0
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