The public’s business: on NH’s legislative agenda this week

Hearings to be held on minimum wage, electronic device tax, workforce housing measures

During this first week of hearings on new bills proposed this legislative session, New Hampshire lawmakers will take up measures involving the minimum wage, requiring greater notice before rent increases are imposed, a sales tax on electronic devices and tax incentives for workforce housing. There will also be a hearing on a bill that would allow college athletes to make money by selling their image for advertising and another that would expand the ARMI tax incentive and student loan program to other targeted industries.

Tuesday, January 14

The House Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee will hold hearings:

At 9:30 a.m. House Bill 1500, which would set up “student bill of rights,” including licensing those that service student loans.

At 10:15 a.m. on HB 1696, which would increase fees for trusts examinations.

At 11 a.m. on HB 1662, which would increase the age for sales and possession of tobacco products and e-cigarette from 19 to 21, which would conform to a new federal law.

The House Judiciary Committee will hold hearings:

At 10 a.m. on HB 1120, which would require periodic water tests of rental property

At 10:30 a.m. on HB 1207, which would require landlords to notify prospective tenants of the use of pesticides or other toxins in the premises.

At 11 a.m. on HB 1120, which would require notice by a landlord of at least 90 days of a proposed rent increase which exceeds 5 percent

The Senate Commerce Committee will hold hearings:

At 1:20 p.m. on Senate Bill 451, which would set up an administrative hearing procedure and penalty for an employer who fails to make payment of wages or who fails to secure workers’ compensation coverage.

At 2:30 p.m. on SB 410, which would set a state minimum wage of $10 an hour in 2020 and $12 in in 2023, and a tipped race of $7.25 an hour.

Wednesday, January 15

At 9:30 a.m. The Senate Ways and Means Committee will hold a hearing on SB 475, which would enable municipalities to grant a property tax credit for densely-built workforce housing.

At 10 a.m. The House Education Committee will hold a hearing on HB 1505, which would allow college athletes to make money for commercial endorsements.

At 10:30 a.m. The House Science, Technology and Energy Committee will hold a hearing on HB 1396, which would require any utility (not just gas and electric) to give 14 days (as opposed to the current 10 days written notice by verify mail (as opposed to regular mail) before cutting off service.

At 10:45 a.m., The House Ways and Means Committee will hold a hearing on HB 1492, which would impose a 4.3 percent sales tax on electric device to fund education

The House Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee will hold hearings:

At 9:45 a.m. on HB 1410, which would ban some flavored vape products.

At 10:30 a.m. on HB 1624, which would establish a moratorium on the sale of e-cigarettes.

The House Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Service Committee will hold hearings:

At 10 a.m. on HB 1574, which would expand the regenerative manufacturing workforce development and student relief program to other targeted industries.

At 11 a.m. on HB 1488, which would prohibit the conditioning of employment or student enrollment on approved housing.

The House Judiciary Committee will hold hearings:

At 10 a.m. on HB 1391, which would prohibit discrimination in housing against persons with pets.

At 10:30 a.m. on HB 1511, which would allow a landlord to evict a tenant in 45 days, compared to the current three months.

At 11 a.m. on HB 1539, which appear to toughen the requirements for landlords to relocate children with elevated lead levels during abatement.

At 11:30 a.m. on HB 1157, which would require a news media to update, retract, or correct an Internet published article about a criminal proceeding following an acquittal, dismissal, or finding of not guilty.

Thursday, January 16

The House Science, Technology and Energy Committee will hold hearings:

At 9:30 a.m. on HB 1518, which would set a fixed alternative compliance payment at $55 per megawatt hour to the renewable energy fund for utilities which fail to meet renewable portfolio requirements or buy renewable energy credits. The rate is currently set by the market and is very low.

At 1:30 p.m. on HB 1684, which would use money from the System Benefit Charge to benefit a new state energy conservation program and PACE, a municipal program. Currently that money is being used for the utility’s conservation programs only.

The House Commerce and Consumer Affairs Committee will hold hearings:

At 10:30 a.m. on HB 1419, which would require banks to offer short term small dollars loans, of less than $2500 for less than a year.

At 1:15 p.m. on HB 1471, which would prohibit banks from calculating debit withdrawals to maximize their overdraft fees.

At 1:45 p.m. on HB 1588, which would set up a mortgage mediation procedure.

At 2:30 p.m. on HB 1589, which would require business accept cash for payment.

The House Ways and Means Committee will hold hearings:

10 a.m. on HB 1477, which would increase the state cigarette tax 12 cents to $1.90 a pack.

1 p.m. on HB 1699, which would increase the tax on e-cigarettes to 40 percent of the price.

Categories: Government, News

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