Ostrowski to retire as CFS CEO

Ostrowski’s work as a practitioner fueled his interest in public policy, and as a result, the agency’s advocacy wing, the NH Children’s Lobby, has become one of the biggest forces for children in the state



Published:

Borja Alvarez de Toledo has been named the next president and CEO of Child and Family Services of New Hampshire, succeeding Mike Ostrowski, who’s stepping down after 27½ years in the job.

Alvarez de Toledo will officially take over after Ostrowski retires at the end of this year.

During Ostrowski’s tenure, the organization has expanded from office-based counseling to field-based services with over 1.3 million miles traveled. 

When he took over in 1991, CFS had a staff of 50, two offices and eight programs. With a $1.2 million budget, it served about 2,000 individuals in Manchester and Concord. Today, its staff totals 300, with 15 offices and a $12 million budget delivering 28 programs across the state. CFS currently serves an average of 15,000 children, youth and families annually.

Ostrowski’s work as a practitioner fueled his interest in public policy, and as a result, the agency’s advocacy wing, the NH Children’s Lobby, has become one of the biggest forces for children in the state.

Alvarez de Toledo joins CFS with 24 years of experience in the field of human services, most recently as director of Child and Family Services at Riverside Community Care of Dedham, Mass.

The Dedham organization’s mission and services are similar to those provided by CFS, including school- and home-based services, adoption, mental health counseling and therapy, child abuse prevention and treatment, special education and early childhood development programs.

Alvarez de Toledo said he was "both excited and honored” to be taking over the helm at CFS.

As for Ostrowski, he called the transition “a bittersweet time,” but he added he was “proud of what I have been a part of here at CFS.”

He added: “I am happy to be passing the torch to a man who will undoubtedly take this organization into the next era of advancing the well-being of children and families, and of improving our world.”


 

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