Hudson man gets 2-1/4 years on porn plea



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NASHUA - Police found more computer equipment than they could carry, containing more child pornography than they cared to count when they searched Charles Lyons' home in 2007, a prosecutor said. On Tuesday, Lyons admitted to possessing two images of sexually abused children and was sentenced to spend the next two years and three months in State Prison. Lyons, 35, was among 24 people arrested in 2007, following a six-month investigation by a task force put together by the state attorney general's office, Assistant Hillsborough County Attorney Roger Chadwick said. Police, including officers from Nashua and Hudson, used a software program to locate and track down known images of child pornography, verified by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Chadwick said. Most child pornography - generally still and video images depicting the sexual abuse of children - is traded online through file-sharing programs. Lyons was an active trader, both downloading porn and providing it for others, Chadwick said. "The defendant had an extensive collection of child pornography, not all of which has been analyzed by the state lab," Chadwick said. "Quite frankly, judge, this was an overwhelming case . . . His server, itself, was so large that police were unable to move it without the assistance of Hudson Ambulance." Lyons was candid when questioned, however, Chadwick said, and prosecutors began working toward a plea deal as his case progressed into the courts. Lyons' plea deal covers only the images of pornography that he downloaded from other sources, Chadwick said. Chadwick declined to estimate how many such images Lyons had, saying police only examined his computer hard drive and didn't have a chance to look into what was stored on his server. Police have no evidence that Lyons ever assaulted any child or created any new images of child pornography, Chadwick said. If such evidence ever surfaced, Lyons would be prosecuted for it anew, he said. Police found some child-size dolls in Lyons' possession, however, Chadwick said, and police became alarmed anew after learning that two younger boys, relatives of Lyons, sometimes slept over in his house at 31 Wason Road, Hudson. Police searched the house again last year, while Lyons was free on bail and found that he had gotten another computer and re-established an Internet connection. Neither Lyons nor his lawyer, Adam Bernstein of Nashua, made any statement before he was sentenced Tuesday. Lyons' plea bargain called for a minimum of two years and three months in prison (the three months was added after the search last year) and up to seven years. An additional 3-1/2 to 7-year sentence will remain suspended for five years after his release. Lyons will undergo evaluation and treatment through the prison's sex offender treatment program and may be required to continue in treatment while on parole. He will also have to register as a sex offender and can have no unsupervised contact with minors. Lyons also agreed to let police keep the server, two laptops and three computers police seized from his home.

 

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